PATIENT-CENTRED ACTIVITIES

ESOT is proud of its work with people with transplants and patient organisations throughout Europe. Our activities aim to promote health and quality of life among the transplant population and welcome the contribution and participation of all transplant professionals, patient organisation representatives, people with transplants and caregivers.

The Patient Inclusion Initiative at ESOT Congress 2021

The members of the steering group of the ESOT-ETPO Alliance have organised two appointments in conjunction with the activities happening at the ESOT Congress 2021. You are all invited to join and to contribute to the discussion.

Advisory board of the ESOT-ETPO alliance

28th August, 2021 from 15.00 to 17.00 (CEST)

This meeting is free and open to the representatives of patient societies and associations and to patient advocates. Participation is possible either in person or online.

View agenda

In preparation for the advisory board, we would like to invite patient organisation representatives, people with transplants, caregivers and transplant professionals to take part in a short short survey and share their feedback, ideas and suggestions on how to move forward.

Survey entries close on 9 August 2021.

Take the survey


Online Symposium

28th August, 2021 from 18.00 (CEST)

Participation in the online symposium is free of charge. The programme and registration link will be available soon.

For information on how to register please contact: giovanna.rossi@esot.org

Patient Perspective Sessions at ESOT Congress 2021

ESOT Congress 2021 offers a variety of exciting patient-centric sessions that aim to foster cooperation and meaningful discussion, empowering people with transplants.

Sunday 29 August

ETAHP - To be close at a distance: Coping with uncertainty and digital caring encounters (I) - 09:00 -10:30 (CEST)

Session topic:

Nursing and health sciences, Patients’ perspective, Specialty Update Symposium

Session discussion:

The main concerns among solid organ recipients is uncertainty regarding graft function and graft survival. This symposium will focus on understanding the fear of graft rejection from a patient perspective and how to approach it as professionals. We will also discuss the use of digital solutions to relieve uncertainty regarding various lifestyle aspects and to empower and support the patients’ self-management despite physical distance. There will be a combination of oral presentations of state of the art and interactive round table discussions.

ETAHP - To be close at a distance: Coping with uncertainty and digital caring encounters (II) - 11:00 - 12:30 (CEST)

Session topic:

Patients’ perspective, Nursing and health sciences, Specialty Update Symposium

Session discussion:

The main concerns among solid organ recipients is uncertainty regarding graft function and graft survival. This symposium will focus on understanding the fear of graft rejection from a patient perspective and how to approach it as professionals. We will also discuss the use of digital solutions to relieve uncertainty regarding various lifestyle aspects and to empower and support the patients’ self-management despite physical distance. There will be a combination of oral presentations of state of the art and interactive round table discussions.

A 360-degree view of risk - 14:00 - 15:30 (CEST)

Session topic:

Nursing and health sciences, Transplant coordinators, Value-based care, Patients’ perspective, Risk

Session discussion:

The risk:benefit question is the basis of all decision making in transplantation. In this session, the question of risk will be examined from the perspective of key stakeholders; namely healthcare professionals, patients and the general public. It will also consider how the practice of defensive medicine plays into decision making from an ethical perspective.

The start of the clinical regenerative therapy era - 14:00 - 15:30 (CEST)

Session topic:

Patients’ perspective, Cells, Cross-organ, Ethics, law and psychosocial, Regenerative medicine

Session discussion:

Stem cells are considered to be the cornerstone of regenerative medicine. Today there are hundreds of clinical trials investigating the use of stem cells to treat life-threatening conditions such as diabetes and kidney failure. However, these trials bring about various regulatory and ethical conundrums that require resolution.

What really matters after transplant? Beyond survival: secrets of success - 14:00 - 15:30 (CEST)

Session topic:

Liver, Nursing and health sciences, Kidney, Heart, Lungs, Value-based care, Patients’ perspective

Session discussion:

Abstract driven session

Managing inequalities in healthcare and transplantation - 16:00 - 17:30 (CEST)

Session topic:

Cross-organ, Patients’ perspective, Value-based care

Session discussion:

COVID-19 pandemic proved to be an enormous stress-test for the healthcare system in which difficult choices regarding allocation of limited resources had to be made. Are inequalities more common during stress conditions or during standard conditions? What is driving inequalities in resource allocation and access to resources and how this problem can be managed?

Monday 30 August

Pushing the boundaries of organs before it’s too late: Pre-emptive regeneration - 08:00 - 09:30 (CEST)

Session topic:

Patients’ perspective, Regenerative medicine, Cells, Cross-organ

Session discussion:

Organ and tissue loss due to disease and injury has encouraged the development of therapies that can regenerate tissues and decrease reliance on organ transplantation. We will explore potential therapies that aim to halt degeneration at an early phase. We will also hold a discussion on the therapeutic future of these therapies from a technical, safety, ethical and patient perspective.

The end of Kaplan-Meier: New endpoints in transplantation - 10:00 - 11:30 (CEST)

Session topic:

Ethics, law and psychosocial, Endpoints, Precision medicine, Patients’ perspective, Value-based care, Cross-organ

Session discussion:

In the current era of transplantation and the excellent outcomes that have been achieved, metrics such as patient and graft survival are increasingly becoming obsolete. This, combined with the emergence of precision medicine and the importance of demonstrating value, means that the time is right to completely rethink what success looks like for transplantation in the 21st century.

Social and ethical aspects of clinical regeneration - 14:45 - 16:15 (CEST)

Session topic:

Ethics, law and psychosocial, Patients’ perspective, Regenerative medicine, Value-based care, Young professionals, Cells

Session discussion:

This joint session with the Regenerative Medicine domain will examine the ethical arguments around regenerative medicine. It will look at the current state-of-play and the future possibilities from both the professional and public perspective and will also address the important topic of sustainability and equity.

Tuesday 31 August

Achieving 'person-centred' not 'patient-centred' care in the era of telemedicine - 11:45 - 13:15 (CEST)

Session topic:

Transplant coordinators, Patients’ perspective, Nursing and health sciences, Value-based care, Young professionals, Endpoints

Session discussion:

The concept of ‘patient-centred care’ is now well established. However this session will explore the important emerging theme of ‘person-centred care’ and will examine how it differs from ‘patient-centred’ care from the perspective of health professionals and transplant recipients. We will explore how new technologies are enabling this process.

Psychosocial aspects of transplantation - 14:45 - 16:15 (CEST)

Session topic:

Patients’ perspective, Ethics, law and psychosocial, Value-based care

Session discussion:

Abstract driven session

From volume to value: Benchmarks for value based models in transplantation - 14:45 - 16:15 (CEST)

Session topic:

Patients’ perspective, Value-based care, Nursing and health sciences, Endpoints

Session discussion:

Current healthcare systems are still diffusely linked to a pay per procedure methodology. Such an approach is associated to a high risk to reduce the efficiency of the systems to achieve their value based goals. That is particularly relevant in the context of limited resource environments as in transplantation. The concept of ‘value-based healthcare’ (VBHC) has been recently proposed with the ambition to maximise outcomes achieved per resources spent. The implementation of VBHC is particularly relevant in organ transplantation, which represents a costly procedure offered to a minority of highly selected patients with end-stage organ disease. However, there is no agreed definition of what value means (for whom) in the health context in general and in particular in the transplantation area (e.g. survival, quality adjusted life years etc.)

Strategies to improve quality and duration of life after kidney and liver transplantation - 14:45 - 16:15 (CEST)

Session topic:

Kidney, Nursing and health sciences, Lungs, Present and future transplant practice, Value-based care, Heart, Liver, Patients’ perspective

Session discussion:

Abstract driven session